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November 13, 2020 » Today News » /

Man from Utah pleads guilty and admits to posing as an Islamic State leader and trying to help the terrorist group

Man from Utah pleads guilty and admits to posing as an Islamic State leader and trying to help the terrorist group

Article RadarTHIS ARTICLE CONNECT:

  • GFATF - LLL - Murat Suljovic Murat Suljovic Murat Suljovic is a Utah man who pleaded guilty to posing...[+]
  • LLL-GFATF-ISIS Islamic State ISIS is an Islamic extremist terrorist organization controlling territory in Iraq...[+]

 Affected Countries: united-states;

A Utah man is looking at a possible 20-year sentence in federal prison after he pleads guilty to posing as an ISIS leader and trying to help the terrorist group.

The charges stem from communications between Murat Suljovic and a man federal prosecutors are identifying as “Person A” back in January of 2019. John Huber, U.S. Attorney for Utah, reported both Suljovic and “Person A” were trying to help a third party plan an attack. Huber isn’t releasing the details about who the other people were, or if they actually were members of ISIS.

Huber said, “When [Suljovic] was communicating with them, he thought he was talking to ISIS.”

Prosecutors reported Suljovic found videos online about how to make bombs more destructive, and he shared those videos with the two supposed ISIS members. He also gave them advice on finding potential targets for these attacks.

“The terrorist attacks that were contemplated and discussed were not [targeted] in Utah,” Huber said.

Huber is keeping some details about the arranged attack under wraps, not wanting to inspire other would-be terrorists. The Deseret News reported some of the materials seized were classified and that 122,000 files were found in Suljovic’s computer.

Huber said, “The video, the attempted assistance to ISIS was very serious conduct that was being proposed.”

Suljovic pleaded guilty to one count of attempting to provide material support to a designated foreign terrorist organization.

“The maximum, here, is 20 years in federal prison. This is a very serious charge. In the world of terrorism prosecutions, this charge is as serious as it gets,” Huber said.

Source: KSL News Radio

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